Please Join Us for this Most Interesting Presentation on….

BIO THREATS

Infectious Diseases and National Security

with

Dr. James Wilson

UNR Research Professor and Director, Nevada Center for Infectious Disease Forecasting

The Ramada, Friday, February 10, 2017, 9:00 a.m.

The United States faces severe challenges from a consorted attack using bio weapons by nation states or terrorist groups.  In addition, the U.S. needs to be prepared to counter naturally occurring infectious diseases, which have become key national security concerns, regardless of source.

UNR Research Professor and Director, the Nevada Center for Infectious Disease Forecasting, Dr. James Wilson, believes that the United States will face growing threats of widespread impacts from infectious diseases of major significance.  He will argue that our intelligence community has failed to provide sufficient warning of such incidents in the past, and that has cost many American lives.  At one point, Wilson believes, our President was placed at great direct risk.

Wilson concludes that public health is in a “state of slow collapse”.  A major failure has been the absence of serious involvement from the intelligence community, working with the bio-medical sectors.  The need for such cooperation is critical– now more than ever.

Dr. James Wilson (MD) led the efforts in the Bush administration to create the nation’s first comprehensive warning system for infectious disease-related national security events.  He led teams that provided advance warning for the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and identification of the United Nations as the source of the Haiti cholera disaster in 2010.

Please join us for what will be a very interesting discussion. A full breakfast will be served ($15 Members, $25 Non-Members, and $10 for students with ID and military personnel in uniform; free for WWII Veterans). We recommend that you arrive by 8:30 to enjoy some breakfast, coffee and conversation.

You are encouraged to RSVP by clicking HERE. You may also RSVP by e-mailing info@nationalsecurityforum.org. Just a reminder, after the forum, we will be accepting new and renewal membership applications for the July 1, 2016 – June 30, 2017 period. Forms will be available at the forum, though you can also access the application form by clicking HERE. For your convenience, we accept cash, check and credit card payments for both the breakfast and membership fees.

Support a Candidate; But Protect the Constitution

  • Special Report for the National Security Forum
  • By Rick Saunders

It is gratifying that President Trump, in his first days in office, personally reached out to two institutions essential to the security of our nation—the U.S. military at the Salute to Our Armed Services Ball on Inauguration Day and the visit to CIA Headquarters the next day. But at both events he seemed to conflate individual political support and institutional loyalty. As institutions, the military and the intelligence community support the President because he is Commander in Chief. As individuals, soldiers and intelligence officers vote and otherwise participate in politics as appropriate under the rules governing their professions. President Trump said things at both events which imply a lack of appreciation for this critical distinction.

At the Armed Services Ball, Trump told the assembled crowd that he “liked the fact that you all voted for me.” Later, in response to a question from a service member, he expressed gratitude for “…the support you’ve given me.” Since at that point he had been President for about nine hours, he can only have been talking about support during the election. Interestingly, the First Lady subsequently expressed the more conventional—and appropriate in this case—thanks for your service.

The remarks at the ball might be written off as enthusiasm late in an exhilarating day. Nevertheless, the President returned to the same theme the next day in a more formal venue—in front of the CIA Memorial Wall. There he said that the military “gave us a tremendous percentage of votes. We were unbelievably successful in the election in getting the vote of the military.” And followed with, “probably most everyone in this room voted for me” because we are on the same “wavelength.”

Of course, serving military and intelligence personnel have the right to vote for whomever they want as well as to engage in political activities as allowed by law and regulation. But as members of organizations charged with guarding our national security, our service to the nation must always be strictly apolitical—as must be the organizations themselves. That is a cornerstone of our democracy. It is why we all—including the President—swear our oaths to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. Political preference is irrelevant. Service to the Commander in Chief and defense of the Constitution are what matter.

Fortunately, our nation enjoys a long tradition of unquestioned, apolitical service by its armed forces and other national security agencies. This tradition will continue under this and future Presidents. As he rightfully honors the bravery and contributions of the military, intelligence, and law enforcement personnel who protect us, our new President must always distinguish between individuals’ personal political views—whatever they may be—and professional service to the nation. The former may be a legitimate concern of a campaign staff during an election cycle. The latter is the business of a Commander in Chief.

*      *      *

Rick Saunders served as an Army officer for 28 years, including as a member of President Reagan’s National Security Council Staff and as Deputy National Security Advisor to Vice President Gore. Since leaving active duty, he has worked with government agencies and businesses involved in homeland security.

Save the Date for this most interesting presentation….

BIO THREATS

Infectious Diseases and National Security

with

Dr. James Wilson

UNR Research Professor and

Director, Nevada Center for Infectious Disease Forecasting

The Ramada, Friday, February 10, 2017, 9:00 a.m.

The United States faces severe challenges from a possible attack using bio weapons by terrorist groups from nation states.  In addition, the U.S. needs to be prepared to counter naturally occurring infectious diseases, which have become key national security concerns, regardless of attribution.

UNR Research Professor and Director, the Nevada Center for Infectious Disease Forecasting, Dr. James Wilson, believes that the United States will face growing threats with wide spread impacts from infectious diseases of major significance.  He will assert that the federal government has failed to provide sufficient warning of such incidents in the past, and that has cost many American lives.  At one point, Wilson believes, our President was placed at great direct risk.

Wilson concludes that public health is in a “state of slow collapse”.  A major failure has been the absence of serious involvement from the intelligence community, working with the bio-medical sectors.  The need for such cooperation is critical– now more than ever.

Dr. James Wilson (MD) led the efforts in the Bush administration to create the nation’s first comprehensive warning system for infectious disease-related national security events.  He led teams that provided advance warning for the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and identification of the United Nations as the source of the Haiti cholera disaster in 2010.

No Need to RSVP Now—Just Mark the Date on Your Calendars.

This is the final announcement for this most timely presentation on….

National Security Challenges 

Facing the Trump Administration:

Threats and Uncertainties

with

Keith Hansen

Former National Intelligence Officer

for Strategic Programs & Nuclear Proliferation

The Ramada, Friday, January 27, 2017, 9:00 a.m.

Donald Trump was sworn in as President on January 20, and will be facing a number of threats and challenges his national security team must immediately address. That includes cyber warfare, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, Russian aggression, Chinese island-building, Iranian (Shia) and Sunni state rivalries, non-state movements in the region (ISIS. Al-Nusra, etc.), and North Korean instability and nuclear weapons provocations.

Keith Hansen will lay out the primary challenges facing the Trump national security team, and will address possible actions and policies the new administration may take. In his 30-year government career, Hansen served as the NIO for Strategic Programs & Nuclear Proliferation, as the Special Assistant to the Director of Central Intelligence, and as a participant in several arms control negotiations, including SALT II, INF, and CTBT.

*If you paid in advance for the meeting but cannot make it due to the change in date, please send us an e-mail and we will submit you a refund*

Please join us for what will be a very interesting discussion. A full breakfast will be served. We recommend that you arrive by 8:30 to enjoy some breakfast, coffee and conversation.

You are encouraged to RSVP by clicking HERE. You may also RSVP by e-mailing info@nationalsecurityforum.org. Just a reminder, after the forum, we will be offering membership applications for the July 1, 2016– June 30, 2017 period.  Forms will be available at the forum, though you can also access the application form by clicking HERE. For your convenience, we accept cash, check and credit card payments for both the breakfast and membership fees.

*Please note the change of date*

NSF members and participants. The likely prospect of significant snow in the Sierras and here in the Valley beginning Wednesday night and continuing through Thursday has caused us to postpone Keith Hansen’s talk to Friday, January 27th. Here is the revised time:

National Security Challenges 

Facing the Trump Administration:

Threats and Uncertainties

with

Keith Hansen

Former National Intelligence Officer

for Strategic Programs & Nuclear Proliferation

The Ramada, Friday, January 27, 2017, 9:00 a.m.

No need to RSVP now—we’ll have the official announcement out later this week.